Flint Michigan: a bold Mayor with a bold idea.
Center for the Study of Economics - Company Message
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

Part 1, Land Value Taxation: Politics, Persuasion, and Practicality - A How-To
2016: Another Year of Advances and Retrenchment
Part 2 - Land Value Taxation: Politics, Persuasion, and Practicality - A How-To
Podcast Features Millbourne, PA, LVT aids town in fiscal rebirth
Hartford Connecticut Explores Land Value Tax to Battle Parking Lot Blight

Most Popular Posts

Noted UK Think Tank: Tax Land Values
Eliminating the property tax? It must not happen, but we’ll see what happens.
Altoona, PA: City tax wholly on land values = normality
Land Value Tax in Britain: Progress While the Rear Guard Digs In
Dr. Herbert Barry's Proposal to Really Reassess Allegheny County

Categories

Act 47
Africa
Agricultural Policy
Allegheny County
ALTER
Altoona
Australia
Australian Capital Territory
Baltimore
Berkshire
Canberra
Clairton
Connecticut
Connecticut General Assembly
Current News Item
de Blasio
Economic Development
Economic Policy
Economic Rent
Economist
Ed Vargas
Education
EPA
Federal Tax Policy
Fiscal Policy and Taxes
Frederick
Free Markets
Gentrification
George Osborne
Global Taxation
Harrisburg
Hartford
Healthy Communities
Housing
Housing Policy
Hurricane Sandy
India
Ireland
Jeffrey Berger
Jimmy Tayoun
Justin Skariah
Kenyatta Johnson
Lancaster
Land Policy
Land Value Tax
Lanesborough
Larry Deutsch
Law and the Constitution
Legislation
Len Fasano
Liberal Democrats
Local Government
Maria Quinones-Sanchez
Martin Looney
Maryland
Massachusetts
Matt Ritter
Matthew Ritter
Mayor Rick Gray
Michael Kinsley
Michigan
Millbourne
Model Legislation
Monroe County
Montreal
Moonachie
Namibia
National Tax Policy
New Jersey
New London
New York City
NY
Oregon
Parking and Transportation
Patricia Dillon
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Portland
Property Assessment
Property Tax Reform
Public Health
Public Opinion
Public Resources
Public Works
Regional Tax Base Sharing
Regionalism
Regressive
Rhode Island
Rochester
Roland Lemar
Sales Taxes
Scranton
Senator Jan Malik
Sin Taxes
Smart Growth
Soda Tax
Taiwan
Tax Exemption and Abatment
Thomas Piketty
Titusville
Tom Kramer
Transportation Funding
Transportation Policy
Uncategorized
United Kingdom
Urban Blight
Urban Rejuvenation
Urban Tax Policy
Vince Cable
Wage and Income Taxes
Wales
Wealth
Wilson Goode Jr.
powered by

Incentive Taxation

Flint Michigan: a bold Mayor with a bold idea.


Flint Mayor Dayne Walling
Flint's Dayne Walling - a Mayor open to ideas and opportunities for his city

The story of Flint Michigan need not be retold here. The story of Flint is the story of many Rustbelt cities from Troy New York to St. Louis Missouri.  Existing for decades as a city with good jobs for all that wanted one, a city that rewarded enterprise and hard work. The downturn of the US automobile industry  was recently (But chimerically) reversed by pumping billions of taxpayer dollars to Chrysler and General Motors, yet has had little effect on the city itself. With all this,Flint could have given up, but it appears they are looking for ways to bring their community back together to heal it, and make it whole again.


Economic collapse is quickly followed by societal collapse. Like Camden New Jersey or Reading Pennsylvania, Flint is dangerous on many levels.  Flint needs stable municipal revenues to help combat these problems.


Second term Mayor Dayne Walling has decided to do something very rare: look at new ideas. In this recent column from the Bridge, a locally based newspaper reporting on Central Michigan, Mayor Walling proposes several sensible ideas to help Michigan cities, not least of which is the land value tax.  To do this, Michigan will need a new approach to property assessment and tax law,because Proposal A limits values to something called "taxable value" which is skewed the property tax and it's valuations out of all relation to market value. Yet, current tax reform bills would provide tax relief to nonresidential property, with no clear revenue replacement for cities that need tax dollars just to survive and operate.  Tax reform has to be for everybody.

We wish Mayor Walling luck and give him our support.

An interesting video journey through Flint shows both a grim reality and the potential for rebirth.  Underneath each shattered and abandoned building, is the land. In Flint as elsewhere, land and its value can serve as a resource while the city finds a new way.
Flint Michigan is Much More than a Michael Moore Movie.

You need Flash Player in order to view this.
Flint, Michigan: Urban Decay in the USA
Abandoned and vandalized homes and businesses. July 2009



2 Comments to Flint Michigan: a bold Mayor with a bold idea.:

Comments RSS
Gina on Thursday, May 10, 2012 8:29 AM
What can a land value tax do that aerotropolis or Next Michigan Development Corporation(NMDC)could not?
Reply to comment
 
Joshua Vincent on Thursday, May 10, 2012 5:13 PM
Dear Gina - Thank you for posting. I think the land value tax that Mayor Walling describes, and what the Center helps implement can exist as a support for the Next Michigan concept. Michigan needs programs of heroic scope to get projects off the ground. They are by necessity of a temporary nature though: they forego much tax revenue and Michigan simply can't afford many of the projects at present. () Yet, once the financial benefits expire, a land value tax will help keep the tax burden on the new capital and labor investment at a reasonable level. And, since NMDC projects are meant to "float all boats" a land value tax would untether surrounding areas and transit corridors from the burdens of the current tax system. Because NMDC projects are tied to inter-modal and aerotropolis concepts (a place intimately tied to commercial and passenger air transport), a land value tax can help leverage the higher land values into revenue to sustain communities and an incentive to build or renovate. Land value tax creates an environment for capital creation and long-term retention. I hope this answered your question.

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment